A Roll of Dice

Luck is common to all. While we curse our misfortune when it works against us, it mostly hides in a cognitive blind spot for the remainder of our experiences. It shouldn’t, for we essentially have no control over this world around us.

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Callum Lamont
Biases and Beliefs

Prior to the development of the scientific method, humans were largely guided in their actions by customs, traditions and intuitions. The initial inception of ritualistic practices within hunter-gatherer societies provided a means through which knowledge and understanding of the land could be passed forward through generations. As societies grew in size and complexity, so to did these forms of teachings, culminating in some of the more well known theologies of today: Judaism, Islam and Christianity. Less focused on the land itself, the lessons contained within these holy documents put more consideration towards interactions with neighbours and a general framework for the community. It is unfair to uniformly condemn religion as without intellectual rigour, however, the interpretive nature of the material, in conjunction with the zealous following it entails, clearly can be an incendiary combination. As a result, the prescription of religion has provided a mixed result for humanity, offering, offering both the enlightenment of the Islamic Golden Age and the brutal ignorance of the Dark Ages

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Callum Lamont
Questioning our choices

A unifying concept between neuroscience and physics is how the great questions in each field boldly attempt to unravel the mystery and fundamental nature of reality. Of course the routes follow divergent paths, with physics focusing on the externalities, such as what is time, space, matter and how did it all begin, while neuroscience has internalised the problem. What is free will? What is consciousness? Do they really exist and, if so, how could either arise from a complex, yet conceptually simple interconnection of nerve cells?

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Callum Lamont