On the preparation of Australian delicacies. An overview of the accepted methodology / by Callum Lamont

Introduction

Figure 1. Components required for Lamingtons

Figure 1. Components required for Lamingtons

Herein, we describe the use of conventional kitchenware appliances and basic baking ingredients to yield a cubic, aerated structure, with unique sweet and chocolatey properties, and which may be beneficial for gastronomical applications. The described method has been widely adopted within regions of the southern hemisphere, particularly Australia, its country of origin. The product has been monikered “Lamingtons", and will be described as such, henceforth. Using this procedure, we were able to successfully replicate previously described results, however, the stability of the product must be called into question, with no discernible traces being measured 24 hours after synthesis.

Method

Figure 2. Prepared samples, layered in a pyramidal structure

Figure 2. Prepared samples, layered in a pyramidal structure

125 000 µg of fat emulsion, extracted from Bos taurus' mammary glands, was combined with 200 000 µg of granulated dextrose (C
6H612O6), 5 mL of vanillin solution and two Gallus gallus eggs (fig. 1). After components were uniformly dispersed, 210 000 µg of ground cereal grains and 112 500 µL of B. taurus' mammary gland secretion was added and combined. Following this, the solution was poured into a rectangular ceramic dish and added to an oven, preheated at 453 °K for 30 min.

Upon removal, and subsequent cooling to 298 °K, the firm substrates was then sliced into equally sized cubic samples. The samples were then coated in a mixture of 125 000 µg H20 (heated to 353 °K), 28.75 g ground seed of Theobroma cacao, 345 000 µg fine dextrose and desiccated fruit of Cocos nucifera. The samples were then left over night before analysis.

Results

Delicious (fig. 2).